Premium Partners

Arizona's Miller: New Transfer Rules Dangerous for Sport

AthleticBusiness.com has partnered with LexisNexis to bring you this content.
Copyright 2017 ProQuest Information and Learning
All Rights Reserved
Copyright 2017 The Arizona Daily Star. All Rights Reserved.

Arizona Daily Star (Tucson)

 



Since the NCAA quietly announced this week it will consider giving transfers immediate eligibility, a chorus of concern has arisen from college basketball coaches.

Including Arizona's Sean Miller.

"If that rule passed, college basketball and college sports would change in such a drastic way that the new model would be unrecognizable to fans, coaches, universities, student-athletes and eventually the TV networks," Miller told the Star. "I hope it never happens for all those who care about college sports."

While the NCAA's study into relaxing transfer rules appears aimed at benefiting athletes, who would need to meet an as-yet-unspecified academic measure to qualify, coaches say there are consequences with current rosters and in a recruiting world that is already increasingly fluid.

"It would turn into one of the dirtiest recruiting periods that you've ever seen," Indiana coach Archie Miller told Scout.com. "You'll have guys talking to your players when they are in your gym. Coaches will recruit players right after games ... it would cripple teams and programs."

Over 700 players transferred from the 351 Division I schools already this year, and the count could climb higher with more liberal rules. Currently, only players who graduate and still have eligibility remaining can play at other schools the following season.

From ABNCAA Proposal Would Nix Transfer Ineligibility

"I understand that people argue coaches can leave anytime, so why not players?" Oregon State coach Wayne Tinkle told the Star. "I'm not naive about that but it's causing a lot of issues. There's people being poached off other teams' roster. But I know the discussion we're having is healthy."

College basketball analyst Jay Bilas has been vocal in support for the change, noting on ESPN.com that because the athletes are being considered unpaid students, not employees, they should be free to leave and be eligible the next season.

"If it is true, that we are talking about students being treated like any other students, the NCAA's transfer policy should be quite simple," Bilas wrote. "Any athlete should be allowed to transfer at any time and accept all allowable aid from any school that will have him or her."

Sean Miller has said over the past few years that having the required redshirt year can help a player learn the UA system, thus making him more prepared upon becoming. Boston College transfer Ryan Anderson redshirted at the UA before playing in 2015-16, and was one of the team's best players.

Arizona guard Dylan Smith is eligible this season after transferring from UNC-Asheville in 2016. Duke transfer Chase Jeter is practicing but sitting out with the Wildcats this season.

Miller's former assistant, Xavier coach Chris Mack, said he benefited as a player by sitting out a year between two seasons at Evansville and two at Xavier.

"There's a constant narrative on social media about the mass exodus of kids and how it's appalling so many kids opt to transfer," Xavier coach Mack told Scout.com. "So now we want to make it easier to transfer? I don't see any logic in that line of thinking. Doesn't surprise me, but it's a step in the wrong direction in my opinion.

"I transferred years ago and I sat out a year. Did me a world of good. It's not the negative people make it out to be."

Read More of Today's AB Headlines

Subscribe to Our Daily E-Newsletter

 
September 9, 2017
 
 
 

 

Copyright © 2017 LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
AB Show 2022 in Orlando
AB Show is a solution-focused event for athletics, fitness, recreation and military professionals.
Learn More
AB Show
Buyer's Guide
Information on more than 3,000 companies, sorted by category. Listings are updated daily.
Learn More
Buyer's Guide