Jason Scott
Jason Scott (jason@athleticbusiness.com) joined the Athletic Business team as the Online Managing Editor in 2015. Before joining AB, Jason worked as the social media manager for a small business, and before that he was a radio producer working with local talk shows and live sports broadcasts. When he's not at work, Jason enjoys reading, podcasts, sports, sophomoric TV cartoons, and long walks on the beach. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri's School of Journalism. 
  • Monday, August, 24, 2015
    Weekend Incidents Put Spotlight on Team Travel Safety

    Accidents in Wisconsin and California involving vehicles carrying student-athletes put the spotlight on team travel safety over the weekend.


  • Friday, August, 21, 2015
    USA Today: Baylor, Coach Ignored Ukwuachu Red Flags

    On Thursday, Baylor football transfer Sam Ukwuachu was found guilty in district court of sexually assaulting a former Baylor women’s soccer player.

    USA Today columnist Dan Wolken argues that if Baylor or football coach Art Briles had paid attention to Ukwuachu’s background during his recruitment, he might never have been on campus in the first place.

    According to Wolken, a basic investigation into the details of Ukwuachu’s dismissal and exit from Boise State in May 2013 would have turned up red flags. At that time, Ukwuachu was dismissed from the team for attacking his girlfriend.

    A second chance didn’t change Ukwuachu’s violent tendencies, and only months after his exit from Boise State, he was in trouble at Baylor.

    Ukwuachu’s behavior cost him the entire 2014 season, and he never played a down of football for the Bears. But the way the university bumbled its way through the proceedings is indicative of a larger problem, Wolken suggests.

    Because he could help the pass rush, Briles and Baylor officials exposed their campus community to the risk of violence, and one victim suffered the consequences of that decision. Wolken argues that it’s time for coaches and officials to be held accountable for recruiting decisions that put other students at risk.

    A statement released by the university following Thursday’s verdict reads: “Acts of sexual violence contradict every value Baylor University upholds as a Christian community. In recent years we have joined university efforts nationally to prevent campus violence against women and sexual assault, to actively support survivors of sexual assault with compassion and care, and to take action against perpetrators. We have established a fully staffed Title IX office that employs a Title IX Coordinator and two full-time investigators. Maintaining a safe and caring community is central to Baylor’s mission and at the heart of our commitment to our students, faculty and staff.”

    Ukwuachu is expected to be sentenced Friday. 


  • Friday, August, 21, 2015
    Packers Unveil Plans for Titletown District Development

    The Green Bay Packers and team president/CEO Mark Murphy unveiled plans Thursday for a new development called the Titletown District.


  • Thursday, August, 20, 2015
    Murky Water Concerns Close Five Providence Pools

    Safety concerns prompted city officials in Providence, R.I. to close the city’s five public pools on Friday, the day before a four-day heat wave struck the city.

    The Providence Journal reports that Evan England, the mayor’s press secretary, said that heavy rains during the week offset the chemical balance of the pool water. This caused calcium in the water to crystalize into a substance called scale. Scale crystals are too small for pool filters to remove, and lingered in the pool making the water cloudy.


  • Wednesday, August, 19, 2015
    Missouri Board OKs $15M for Stadium Construction

    In an effort to retain the Rams or lure another NFL franchise to the city, a Missouri board approved $15 million in tax credits on Tuesday to help build a new football stadium in downtown St. Louis.

    Missouri Governor Jay Nixon, along with the Regional Convention and Sports Complex Authority, proposed the new stadium along the Mississippi River to counter the Rams’ possible move back to Los Angeles, where Rams owner Stan Kroenke has proposed building a $1.8 billion stadium.

    As Fox Sports reports, the Missouri Development Finance Board approved the $15 million tax credit plan, despite opposition from board member and Lieutenant Governor Peter Kinder. The sports authority plans to request an additional $17.5 million in tax credits in each of the next two years, bringing the total to $50 million.

    The proposed riverfront project is estimated to come with a $998 million price tag. A plan presented to the board on Tuesday laid out a way to raise another $610 million, utilizing funds from an NFL team owner, an NFL loan program, and the sale of seat licenses. Under that plan, the state would need to issue another $201 million in bonds, and $187 million in tax credits and other incentives.

    Lawmakers who oppose the plan, including Representative Jay Barnes, issued a lawsuit saying that a taxpayer-funded stadium project should have approval from the state legislature.

    “If you want to be responsible stewards of taxpayer dollars, you cannot move forward on this proposal as it is presented,” Barnes said to members of the board.

    While some members of the legislature have vowed to fight funding the new stadium, members of the board praised the plan as a boost to the economy.

    “Our singular focus ought to be what’s best for the economic development of the state of Missouri,” said board member Reuben Shelton. 


  • Wednesday, August, 19, 2015
    No Social Media, No Problem for Clemson Football

    The first day of fall camp for the Clemson University football team was Aug. 3, and that also marked the occasion of players hanging up their hashtags until the winter. That means no Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, no pokes, retweets or mentions until the pads are put back into storage.


  • Tuesday, August, 18, 2015
    Plastic Fiber in Toronto Pool May Be Public Health Risk

    Plastic fibers from a fraying pool liner found floating in the popular Alex Duff outdoor swimming pools at Toronto’s Christie Pits could pose a risk public safety.


  • Monday, August, 17, 2015
    Color-Changing Film Could Help Detect Concussions

    In an effort to better understand and protect against concussions, a team of University of Pennsylvania researchers has developed a new material that changes color based on how hard it is hit.