RECENT ARTICLES
  • Female Marines Train at Historically All-Male Base

    by Courtney Cameron August 2018

    Last week, the Marine Corps marked 100 years of women in service, and celebrated the occasion (unofficially) with a series of groundbreaking events staged over the past 12 months. The Orange County Register provided a rundown of the year’s notable firsts:

  • Army to Abandon Age-Specific Fitness Standards

    by Paul Steinbach July 2018

    The U.S. Army has announced that it will no longer judge the fitness levels of personnel differently based on age, but rather on varying job demands.

    A new Army Combat Fitness Test will replace the current Army Physical Fitness Test effective October 2020. Whereas the APFT does not require older soldiers to perform as well as their younger counterparts, the ACFT will introduce a scoring scale based on standards a solider will need to survive in combat.

    "The bottom line is combat does not discriminate, bullets coming at you don't discriminate, the enemy coming at you does not discriminate ... by height, by gender, by age, and, quite frankly, by what uniform you are wearing," Maj. Gen. Malcom Frost told military.com. "If you are a battalion O-5 or a brigade O-6 commander or command sergeant major that has been selected for the privilege to command or serve in a nominative position in a battalion or brigade in the United States Army, you must lead soldiers in combat and as such you must pass the Army Combat Fitness Test for whatever standard is designated."

    Six physical events will make up the ACFT. Beginning this October, the Army will select 60 battalions across the active Army, National Guard and Reserve to participate in one-year field test of the new ACFT to establish how the test will be scored, make adjustments to events as needed and consider the policies required for implementation, according to Frost, who added that the ACFT will be based on several studies that have looked at the 113 warrior tasks and battle drills — common tasks every soldier needs to be able to perform to survive on the battlefield — as well as soldier feedback from the past 15 years of combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    An example of a task a soldier must be able to complete in combat is the evacuation of a casualty from a combat vehicle. Said Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel Dailey, "That person inside that vehicle doesn't care whether you are a woman, a man, 50, 60, 18 or 24 — he or she needs to come out if it's on fire."

  • Military Considers Fitness Waivers for Skilled Recruits

    by Courtney Cameron March 2018

    With the number of eligible military recruits in decline, congress has opened itself to the possibility of increasing the available number of fitness waivers for new enlisters, particularly for candidates with proven skills in other high-demand areas.

  • Central Missouri Proves Need for ROTC Athletic Trainers

    by Courtney Cameron November 2017

    The U.S. Army has high standards for fitness — and no one knows that better than the individuals tasked with treating soldiers' injuries. Rachel Brown is an instructor/ROTC athletic trainer at the University of Central Missouri, where a flourishing ROTC program prepares a battalion of roughly 125 cadets annually. Her ultimate goal: to ensure that every cadet passes a monthly regimented Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) without incurring a debilitating or chronic injury.

  • Army Announces New Combat Readiness Fitness Test

    by Courtney Cameron November 2017

    After an evaluation of the military’s approach to physical fitness spanning nearly 20 years, the Army has announced a new combat skill-centered fitness test will be introduced in 2020.

  • AB Show 2017: Pre-Show Coverage

    by Andy Berg November 2017

    Adobe Spark Page

  • Private College Combines Phys Ed, Patriotism

    by Courtney Cameron October 2017

    In the current, volatile sports environment of protest and debate, a private college in Missouri has no qualms about publicizing its stance on recent issues.

  • Army Implements First Combat-Specific Fitness Test

    by Courtney Cameron July 2017

    Over the past 10 years, the Army has been working to develop a more effective model of the traditional Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT).

  • Commander Proposes Rec Facility on Former Prison Site

    by Courtney Cameron July 2017

    The prison commander at the Guantanamo Bay naval base has filed notice with a federal court of plans to demolish the former detention site Camp Iguana and reclaim the area for recreational use.

  • Air Force Major Dies After Fitness Test

    by Andy Berg June 2017

    An Air Force Major died Saturday after losing consciousness during his fitness test.

    Maj. Elgin "Rick" Ross, 47, became unresponsive during his fitness test Friday at Buckley Air Force Base in Colorado. He died early Saturday at University of Colorado Hospital.

    The reason for Ross’ death is under investigation.

    Airmen are required to complete a physical fitness test twice a year. The test consists of three components that measure body composition, aerobic fitness and muscular fitness. According to the Air Force’s website, body composition is evaluated by abdominal circumference measurements, while the aerobic component includes a 1.5-mile run. Muscular fitness is evaluated by the number of push-ups and sit-ups completed within one minute.

    The Air Force Times reported that Ross was head of the Air Force’s Total Force Service Center in Denver where he provided customer service to Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve and retired airmen.

    Brig. Gen. Ellen Moore, Air Reserve Personnel Center commander, expressed her sympathies in a statement. "We are heartbroken over the loss of our teammate and friend," Moore said. "ARPC is coming together in this sad time, and we are ensuring that Rick's wife and children are taken care of now and in the future."